Academic Code of Conduct

Section I: Definitions of Academic Dishonesty

A. Plagiarism

Plagiarism is stealing the words or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s own, either by copying someone else’s work or by paraphrasing. Each time a writer or speaker presents someone else’s ideas or works, credit must be given to that person. Some selected examples of plagiarism include:

1. Submitting written or oral work done totally or in part by someone else.

2. Failing to give credit in a paper, footnote, or speech for works or ideas originated by another person.

3. Failing to use quotation marks when quoting written material directly from another person.

4. Paraphrasing another’s ideas or words without indicating the source of the information.

5. Submitting work that was submitted in another course, whether in its original or altered form, without first obtaining the permission of the instructor

6. Knowingly aiding any of the above offenses.

 

B. Fabrication

Fabrication is inventing information. Although fabrication may involve plagiarism, fabrication does not include necessarily the stealing of ideas from another writer. Fabrication, however, is dishonest. With fabrication the writer or speaker is deceiving an audience by presenting work as based on real, established facts when those facts do not exist. Some selected examples of fabrication would include:

1. Using false citations, i.e., falsely attributing information or ideas to an authoritative source.

2. Using graphs or statistical information not supported by existing data based on actual research.

3. Falsely claiming that one did formal research in support of a paper or speech.

4. Reporting data that was not actually collected.

5. Knowingly aiding any of the above offenses.

 

C. Cheating

Cheating is presenting material as proof that the writer or speaker has learned the information when, in fact, he/she has not. Some selected examples of cheating would include:

1. Allowing another person to do one’s work and presenting it under one’s own name.

2. Using unauthorized notes, study aids, or information from another student on in-class examinations.

3. Altering a graded work after it has been returned, and then re-submitting the work as though for the firs time.

4.  Having another respond to one’s name during roll call or having another sign one’s name on an attendance sheet.

5. Obtaining, either directly or with the help of another, an advance copy of an examination.

6. Knowingly aiding any of the above offenses.

 

 D. Forgery and Altering Documents

Forgery is writing someone else’s name on a record or document. Forgery also means altering a record or document for the purpose of presenting inaccurate information. Some selected examples of forgery would be:

1.      Altering official academic records

2.      Making an unauthorized signature for a faculty member or other University Official.

3.      Falsifying information on an official academic document.

 

Section II: Degrees of Academic Dishonesty

Unintentional Dishonesty

Incidents of dishonesty which are likely the consequence of inexperience, naivety, or sincere misunderstanding, at the decision of the faculty member

Intentional Dishonesty

  Minor Offenses

                        Plagiarism in which:

1. The nature or extent of the offense indicates intentional dishonesty AND

2. is minor enough that its inclusion without detection would not have raised the grade received for the assignment AND

3. The dishonesty is perpetrated by a freshman or a sophomore AND

4.  The dishonesty is a first offense

Fabrication in which

1. The nature or extent of the offense indicates intentional dishonesty AND

2. is minor enough that its inclusion without detection would not have raised the grade received for the assignment AND

3. The dishonesty is perpetrated by a freshman or a sophomore AND

4. The dishonesty is a first offense

There are no Minor Offenses of Cheating

There are no Minor Offenses of Forgery and Altering Documents

Serious Offenses

Plagiarism in which:

1. The nature or extent of the offense indicates intentional dishonesty AND

2. The plagiarism represents a minor portion of the submitted work, but the inclusion without detection of fraudulent portions could potentially raise the grade for the assignment OR

3.  The dishonesty is perpetrated by a junior or a senior OR

4. The dishonesty is a second offense

Fabrication in which:

1. The nature and extent of the offense indicates intentional dishonesty AND

2. The fabrication represents a minor portion of the submitted work, but the inclusion without detection of fraudulent portions could potentially raise the grade for the assignment OR

3. The dishonesty is perpetrated by a junior or a senior OR

4. The dishonesty is a second offense

Cheating in which:

  1. There is no pre-meditation to cheat AND

  2. The cheating represents a minor portion of the submitted work, but the inclusion without detection of fraudulent portions could potentially raise the grade for the assignment 

There are no Serious Offenses of Forgery and Altering Documents

            Egregious Offenses

Plagiarism in which:

1. The nature or extent of the offense indicates intentional dishonesty AND

2. The plagiarism represents a significant portion of the submitted work OR

3.  The dishonesty is a third offense

Fabrication in which:

1. The nature or extent of the offense indicates intentional dishonesty AND

2. The fabrication represents a significant portion of the submitted work OR

3. The dishonesty is a third offense

Cheating in which:

  1. There is pre-arrangement to cheat, i.e., preparing “cheat sheets” for an exam, obtaining an advance copy of the exam, etc. AND

  2. the cheating represents a significant portion of the submitted work OR

  3. the dishonesty is a second offense

All cases of Forgery and Alteration of Documents shall be considered egregious

 

All second offenses shall be defined as serious or egregious

All third offenses shall be defined as egregious

All intentional academic dishonesty by juniors and seniors shall be defined as serious or egregious

 

Section III: Procedures and Punishments

Unintentional Dishonesty

Faculty should clearly warn the student and educate them as to proper academic practices. Such cases need not be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs or the Academic Integrity Committee.

Intentional Dishonesty

            Minor Offenses

The professor shall provide a written account of the incident to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall keep a record of the report and refer the incident to the Chair of the Academic Integrity Committee. The Committee Chair shall bring the report to the Committee at its next scheduled monthly meeting, and invite the student and the instructor to meet with the Committee.

The Committee may impose a maximum penalty of an “F” for the course, or a lesser penalty as it deems appropriate.

The Committee shall report the proceedings and penalty to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall then communicate the decision to the professor and the student, in writing, within 3 working days. The Office of Academic Affairs shall also report the action to the Director of Financial Aid, who shall notify any academic or athletic department that has awarded an institutionally-supported scholarship to the student.

In the event that the Academic Integrity Committee has not reached a decision by the time final grades are due, or if the matter is still in appeals, then the instructor shall assign a grade of “I” for the course. The instructor shall then change the grade to reflect the outcome of the process.

               Serious Offenses

The professor shall provide a written account of the incident to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall keep a record of the report and refer the incident to the Chair of the Academic Integrity Committee. The Committee Chair shall bring the report to the Committee at its next scheduled monthly meeting, and invite the student and the instructor to meet with the Committee.

The Committee may impose a maximum penalty of a one semester suspension from the University, or lesser penalty as it deems appropriate. The Committee shall report the proceedings and penalty to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall then communicate the decision to the professor, the student, and the Registrar, in writing, within 3 working days. The Office of Academic Affairs shall also report the action to the Director of Financial Aid, who shall notify any academic or athletic department that has awarded an institutionally-supported scholarship to the student.

A record of the offense and the penalty shall be included in the student’s academic record. In the event of a suspension, the Committee may place a statement on the student’s transcript indicating that the suspension was the result of academic dishonesty.

If the student commits no other academic dishonesty offenses, an appeal may be made to the Academic Integrity Committee to remove the record of the offense from the student’s record upon graduation.

In the event that the Academic Integrity Committee has not reached a decision by the time final grades are due, or if the matter is still in appeals, then the instructor shall assign a grade of “I” for the course. The instructor shall then change the grade to reflect the outcome of the process.

             Egregious Offenses

The professor shall provide a written account of the incident to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall keep a record of the report and refer the incident to the Chair of the Academic Integrity Committee. The Committee Chair shall bring the report to the Committee at its next scheduled monthly meeting, and invite the student and the instructor to meet with the Committee.

The Committee may impose a maximum penalty of expulsion from the University, or a lesser penalty as it deems appropriate. The Committee shall report the proceedings and penalty to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall then communicate the decision to the professor, the student, and the Registrar, in writing, within 3 working days. The Office of Academic Affairs shall also report the action to the Director of Financial Aid, who shall notify any academic or athletic department that has awarded an institutionally-supported scholarship to the student.

A record of the offense and the penalty shall be included in the student’s academic record. In the event of a suspension or expulsion, the Committee may place a statement on the student’s transcript indicating that the suspension or expulsion was the result of academic dishonesty.

If the student commits no other academic dishonesty offenses, an appeal may be made to the Academic Integrity Committee to remove the record of the offense from the student’s record upon graduation.

In the event that the Academic Integrity Committee has not reached a decision by the time final grades are due, or if the matter is still in appeals, then the instructor shall assign a grade of “I” for the course. The instructor shall then change the grade to reflect the outcome of the process.

Section IV: The Academic Integrity Committee

The Academic Integrity Committee shall be composed of 5 tenured faculty members, one from each of the four academic divisions, and one faculty representing Interdisciplinary Studies. The Registrar shall serve as an ex officio member of the Committee.

Faculty shall serve on the Academic Integrity Committee for a term of 2 academic years, and shall appoint a Chair for a term of one academic year.

The Committee will have standing monthly meetings, on days and times determined by the Chair, at which it hears all cases of academic dishonesty that have been reported since the previous meeting.

 

 Part IV: Procedure for Appeals

Both the instructor and the student shall have the right to appeal the decision of the Academic Integrity Committee to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Upon request for an appeal, the Vice President will appoint an ad hoc Appeals Committee consisting of five tenured faculty who have no previous involvement with the incident. The ad hoc Appeals Committee may uphold or overturn the decision of the Academic Integrity Committee. The ad hoc committee will report its decision to the Office of Academic Affairs, which shall then communicate the decision to the professor and the student, in writing, within 3 working days.

The instructor and the student shall have the right to appeal the decision of the ad hoc Appeals Committee to the President. The President may uphold or overturn the decision.

If, after all campus channels have been exhausted, no satisfactory solution has been reached, the student or instructor may request a hearing before the USAO Board of Regents. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEMONSTRATIONS

The right of the student to free speech in order to express opinion, and the right to petition and assemble for this purpose, is recognized by the University. Such expression, petitions, or assemblies must take place in an orderly manner to avoid in any way curtailing the legal operation of the University, interfering with the employees or the University in the normal performance of their assigned duties in a manner that would substantially hinder or prevent them from performing those duties, and/or violating the right of other students to pursue any part of their University life.

Definitions: Speech, as used in this document, is the oral presentation of ideas in an open forum. Demonstration is any process of showing individual or group cause by speech, example, group action, or other form of public expression.

Such expression, petitions, and/or assemblies on University premises shall be conducted in compliance with the following regulations with appropriate time, place, and manner limitations:

  1. No person or persons may obstruct the flow of traffic on open streets, sidewalks, hallways, or through entrances or exits of any building.

  2. No person or persons may physically or verbally molest or abuse visitors or members of the University community including those who may be engaged in counter-demonstrations.

  3. No person or persons may either orally or on signs or handbills use statements libeling any person or persons.

  4. Assemblies may not disrupt classes or other University business.

  5. No person or persons may take any action that damages property or official records of the University or of members of the University community.

  6. Time, Place, and Manner Limitations: Interior: Demonstrations, debates, and speeches may be held inside University facilities only in compliance with established procedures for the use of the facility. University facilities must be reserved through the Office of the Vice President of Administrative Affairs. Exterior: University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma reserves the right to require that speakers, scheduled and unscheduled, sponsored and un-sponsored, University affiliated or visitors to the campus, use designated locations in order to avoid unreasonable conflict with the normal functions and requirements of the University and to assure that the flow of vehicular and pedestrian traffic will not be impeded. Any exterior speech or demonstration shall be no closer than 100 feet of University buildings. Authorization for any speech or demonstration will require identification of the individual or organization and agreement to abide by University regulations. No musical instrument or sound amplification equipment of any kind, including stereo speakers, turntables, stationary or mobile public address systems, is allowed on the concourses, streets, or in areas adjacent to academic buildings without the approval of the Office of the Vice President for Administrative Affairs.

  7. If students who are demonstrators or picketers violate one or more of these conditions, they shall be advised of their violation by a representative of the University, and those who continue shall be subject to discipline by the University, pending action through regular disciplinary procedures.

  8. Non-student demonstrators or picketers who violate one or more of the above conditions shall be advised of their violation, and those who continue shall be asked to leave the campus. Those who persist shall be considered trespassers and shall be turned over to the proper authorities.

  9. If the violations cannot be ended through the regular procedures of the University, law enforcement officers may be requested to protect persons and property of visitors, faculty, staff, and students of the University and to enable the University to operate in an orderly manner.