Philosophy and Religion

A minor in Philosophy and Religious Studies will prepare students for further graduate study in philosophy and religious studies or fields traditionally related to philosophy, such as law and other fields in the humanities.

Minor in Philosophy and Religious Studies

18 hours, must choose at least one “topical course”, one “historical course”, and one upper division (junior or senior level) course.

TOPICAL COURSE ELECTIVES:
PRLG 1103   Logic

PRLG 1233   Sign, Symbol, Myth

PRLG 2103   Comparative Religion

PRLG 2273   Ethics

PRLG 2383   Aesthetics

PRLG 2243   Philosophy of Religion

PRLG 3433   Social and Political Philosophy

 

HISTORICAL COURSE ELECTIVES:
PRLG 2003   Introduction to Philosophy and Religious Studies

PRLG 2213   Medieval and Modern Philosophical and Religious Thought

PRLG 2223   19th and 20th Century Philosophy

PRLG 3003   Greek and Roman Moral Philosophy

 

UPPER-LEVEL COURSE ELECTIVES:
PRLG 3203   The Idea of God from an Inter-Religious Perspective

PRLG 4003   The Wisdom of Living

PRLG 4013   Conversations Among Science, Philosophy, and Religion

PRLG 4133   Symbolic Logic

PRLG 4590   Honors Research

PRLG 4903   Advanced Seminar in Philosophy and Religion

PRLG 4990   Tutorial

 

COURSE LISTINGS in PHILOSOPHY and RELIGION (PRLG)

1103       LOGIC
              Methods and principles used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning, including logical functions of
              language, the nature of logical argument, and methods of deduction and induction; emphasis on practical 
              application. 3 hours

1233       SIGN, SYMBOL, AND MYTH
              Functions of sign, symbol, and myth in the life of humans as each may be observed to order and to organize
              human existence both individually and corporately. 3 hours

2003       INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
              This course will survey some of the topics covered by philosophy and religious studies in the Western world from
              Ancient Greece to the present. It is also intended to illuminate the history of particular ideas and questions of the
              Western tradition. Some of these questions include, but are not limited to, the nature of truth, how one should
              act, how we come to possess knowledge, the nature of God and belief, and the meaning of life. 3 hours

2103       COMPARATIVE RELIGION
              Survey of major religions of world civilizations, as well as ideologies which compete for human religious
              commitment; includes Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and others. 3 hours

2213       MEDIEVAL AND MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL AND RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
              This course examines Western philosophical and religious thought from approximately 450 CE to 1800 CE, starting
              with works of the post-Nicene Christian Church through works of the late Enlightenment. The course surveys early
              Christian theology, medieval Jewish and Muslim thought, the work of Thomists and Scholastics, and philosophy of
              the modern period, especially that of Descartes, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant. 3 hours

2223       19TH AND 20TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY
              This course will cover European thought after Kant and Hegel, including, but not limited to, philosophical
              movements such as existentialism, phenomenology, philosophy of language and philosophy of mind, critical
              theory, deconstruction, feminism, and post-colonialism. Students will become acquainted with some of the major
              philosophical movements of the past two hundred years as well as the ways in which they have shaped
              contemporary thought. 3 hours

2243       PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
              This course explores a number of the topics and themes traditionally considered under the disciplinary heading of
              philosophy of religion. The class will consider the nature of religious experience, the relationship between faith
              and reason, the nature of God, and relevant criticisms of the Western religious experience, including the problem
              of evil. Constructive theologies may also be considered. As a survey course, this class will expose students to a
              variety of perspectives and will acquaint them with philosophical forms of expression and critical analysis. 3 hours

2273       ETHICS
              Major positions in Western and Eastern ethical thought from Homer to the present in an attempt to discover the
              basic principles of moral decisions. 3 hours

2383       AESTHETICS
              Systematic inquiry into major philosophical problems involving definition and meaning of art, aesthetic value,
              aesthetic judgment, and the creative process. 3 hours

3003       GREEK AND ROMAN MORAL PHILOSOPHY
              This course focuses on the development of Moral Philosophy in the Greco-Roman World from the seventh century
              BCE to the 3rd century CE. The course also examines the impact of cultural influences on the development of
              Moral Philosophy. 3 hours

3203       THE IDEA OF GOD FROM AN INTER-RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVE
              This course will expose students to a variety of contemporary ideas regarding the object of religious faith from
              multiple religious traditions. In particular, ideas regarding the divine from Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Native
              American thought, and western atheism will be emphasized. The course will focus on the ways in which the divine
              is conceptualized, and how this conceptualization is related to ethical, social, political, and philosophical concerns.
              Students will be encouraged to develop their own “theology” in relation to the multiple theologies encountered
              within the class. 3 hours

3433       SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
              This course will survey some major philosophical positions on the nature of a person’s relation to society and the
              state. The course will generally include, but is not limited to, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau,
              Hegel, Marx, and Rawls. 3 hours

4003       THE WISDOM OF LIVING
              This seminar will acquaint students with philosophy and religion as they can be applied to considerations of
              everyday life. In particular, the course will examine the ways in which theoretical considerations from a range of
              thinkers can alter one’s diet, relationships, career, and purpose in life. Students will be given the opportunity to
              implement these considerations in a constructive component of the course. 3 hours

4013       CONVERSATIONS AMONG SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY, AND RELIGION
              This seminar aims to understand recent interactions among the sciences, philosophy, and religion. Areas which
              may be covered include: philosophy of biology, the evolution of religion, the evolution of morality, and theologies
              which are in conversations with the sciences. Particular attention will be given to research conducted in the past
              twenty years. 3 hours

4133       SYMBOLIC LOGIC
              This course is a continuation of PRLG 1103 to include symbolic logic. Prerequisite: PRLG 1103. 3 hours

4590       HONORS RESEARCH
              Arranged independent research culminating in original thesis paper and defense of position assumed. 
              Prerequisite: 9 hours of philosophy/religion courses or permission of instructor.  1-3 hours

4903       ADVANCED SEMINAR IN PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION
              This course is an advanced seminar which allows for an intensive examination of philosophical and religious ideas.
              Content is to be determined by the instructor. 3 hours

4990       TUTORIAL
              Independent study in philosophic and religious thought under faculty supervision. (May be repeated for total of 6
              hours with change in title and content). 1-3 hours