Money and Banking Syllabus

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1829 MGMT 4883 Money and Banking
Fall 2013
1:30-2:55 TTh
Troutt 306
 

Jennifer Long, Ph.D.
Office: Troutt 317
Phone: 574-1217
Email: jlong@usao.edu
Office Hours: MWF 8-10; TTh 8-9 and 12-1 and by appointment and/or luck

 

Course Description

Understanding the systems of money, banking, and financial markets is critical, especially in light of recurrent financial crises that affect not only an individual's ability to make a living, but entire political and social systems.  This course is a senior-level survey of the core issues surrounding money, banking, and financial markets. Some of these topics will be familiar to you from other classes, especially Principles of Economics, but we will explore them in more depth here. Topics will include the historical development of money and banking, how modern financial systems operate, the regulations placed upon those systems, and what these systems mean in an international economy.

Textbook

Wright and Quadrini. Money and Banking.  ISBN 9781453343791


Exams and Grading

Three exams will be spaced evenly through the semester (see end of syllabus for dates). Only the final will be cumulative. Be aware, however, that since theory builds on itself, the other two exams will be comprehensive in that understanding previous material may be necessary to understanding current material. Exams will be composed of short answer, essay, and some mathematical problems depending on the material. 

Grading

Exam 1: 100 points
Exam 2: 100 points
Exam 3: 200 points

Grades will be assigned as a percentage of 400 total points.


Tentative Schedule/Course Outline

We will proceed through the following chapters as quickly as we can, but as slowly as we need to. You are expected to have read the textbook chapters before the date listed. 

Date

Topic

Reading

Sept 3

Introduction

 

Sept 5

The History and Purpose of Money

Ch. 3

Sept 10

The History and Purpose of Money

Ch. 3

Sept 12

The History and Purpose of Money

Ch. 3

Sept 17

The History and Purpose of Financial Markets

Ch. 2

Sept 19

Interest Rates

Chs. 5 and 6

Sept 24

Interest Rates

Chs. 5 and 6

Sept 26

The Loanable Funds Market

Chs. 7, 8, and 9

Oct  1

The Loanable Funds Market

Chs. 7, 8, and 9

Oct 3

The Loanable Funds Market

Chs. 7, 8, and 9

Oct 8

FIRST EXAM

 

Oct 10

Market Regulation

Chs. 11 and 13

Cot 15

Market Regulation

Chs. 11 and 13

Oct 17

FALL BREAK

 

Oct 22

Market Regulation

Chs. 11 and 13

Oct 24

The Money Supply

Chs. 14 and 15

Oct 29

The Money Supply

Chs. 14 and 15

Oct 31

Monetary Policy

Chs. 16 and 17

Nov 5

Monetary Policy

Chs. 16 and 17

Nov 7

Monetary Policy

Chs. 16 and 17

Nov 12

SECOND EXAM

 

Nov 14

Demand for Money

Ch. 20

Nov 19

Demand for Money

Ch. 20

Nov 21

Foreign Exchange

Ch. 18

Nov 26

Foreign Exchange

Ch. 18

Nov 28

THANKSGIVING BREAK

 

Dec 3

International Finance

Ch. 19

Dec 5

International Finance

Ch. 19

Dec 10

Crisis of 2007-2008

Ch. 12

Dec 12

FINAL EXAM 2:00-3:30

 

 

Class Policies

Attendance

It t is your decision whether to attend class or not. You will not be penalized directly for missing class, but no make-up exams will be given, and you are responsible for all information disseminated in any classes that you miss.

Cell Phones and Other Electronic Devices

Cell phones, laptops, and other beeping, chirping, singing, game-playing, text-messaging and noise-making electronic things must be turned OFF during class and kept out of sight. Because of the potential for distraction (for you and those sitting around you), laptops use is not allowed in class. (Exceptions can be made only in the case of a documented accommodation need. Please inform the instructors if this is the case).

We know you think that you can listen to lecture, check your Facebook, take notes, text your friends about where to meet for lunch, formulate intelligent questions, read your email, participate in class discussion and listen to your iPod all at the same time, but you can't. Lots of good research tells us that multitasking detracts from the learning experience and can actually make you dumber (see, for example, "The Myth of Multi-Tasking" at http://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-myth-of-multitasking).

Be fully present in the classroom; treat class as a one hour refuge from all the other electronic demands in your life. You might find that all those pressing demands on your time—all those incoming texts, all the new Facebook statuses, all the waiting messages—really aren’t all that urgent. You might even find that the electronic silence gives you a calm space in which to really think and learn.

That said, if your cell phone or other beeping, chirping, singing, game-playing, text-messaging or noise-making electronic thing goes off in class, you will be asked to leave. If you're texting or emailing or checking your Facebook in class, you'll be asked to leave.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated in this or any other class on campus. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: Plagiarism, Fabrication, Cheating, and Forgery and Altering Documents. All instances of dishonesty will be result in penalty without exception. The maximum penalty for the first offense is a grade of "F" for the course  and the incident will be reported to the Academic Vice President for inclusion in the student's permanent university file. A second and all subsequent offenses (in any course across the university) may result in the student's expulsion from the university. A full explantion of the University's Academic Code of Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook, pages 9-11. We're really not kidding about this. Don't cheat. We mean it.

ADA Statement

According to the ADA, each student with a disability is responsible for notifying the University of his/her disability and requesting accommodations. If you think you have a qualified disability and need classroom accommodations, contact the office of Student Services located on the third floor of the Student Center.  Please advise the professor of your disability as soon as possible, to ensure timely implementation of appropriate accommodations. Faculty have an obligation to respond when they receive official notice of a disability from Student Services but are under no obligation to provide retroactive accommodations.  To receive services, you must submit appropriate documentation and complete an intake process during which the existence of a qualified disability is verified and reasonable accommodations are identified.  Call 405-574-1278 for more information.